Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach, SA, 5354
    
It's possible 20 different species can look identical (needing dissection to differentiate); as such many id's here don't go to species level
Stat'NotesThumbnails: 1259.   226 native species listed, with 179 from Ellura
Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Insects (Insecta)
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Fairy Moth
:Adeloidea Adelidae
Dapled Fairy Longhorn Moth
Ceromitia iolampra?
Na
a
Head & body ~7mm, wingspan ~15mm. Very long antennae at ~16mm long.
As you can see this one is very deformed. We'd suggest the wings didn't form properly in the begining, rather than being crushed later, as they both appear to be very restricted at certain points. Due to it's poor condition, it's difficult to be sure of our id.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Fairy Moth
:Adeloidea Adelidae
Black-headed Fairy Longhorn Moth
Nemophora laurella
Na
a
SynonymNemophora topazias
 
Profile
Dorsal
Very long Antenna
Head
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Anthelid Moth
:Bombycoidea Anthelidae
Undescribed Anthelid
Anthela ANIC12
Na
a
Thank you Ethan Beaver for identifying this species for us

This is figured on Bold as Anthela ANIC12.
Head & body ~25mm, wingspan ~70mm.
This is a fairly worn specimen.
Found in February.
Dorsal
Hindwing
Antennae
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Anthelid Moth
:Bombycoidea Anthelidae
Toothed Anthelid
Anthela basigera?
Na
em
Id was arrived at by matching on-line photo's. In future we will raise those we find to improve the id.
Whole, dorsal, ~30mm
Whole, ventral
Close up, head
Close up, white verrucae
Close up, red hair + blue patch
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Anthelid Moth
:Bombycoidea Anthelidae
Eyespot Anthelid
Anthela ocellata
Na
a
Found on the ground dead. Wingspan ~45mm
Male, dorsal
Male, forewing
Male, antenna
Male, antenna
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Anthelid Moth
:Bombycoidea Anthelidae
Ruby Anthelid
Anthela rubeola
Na
em
Head & body ~20mm, wingspan ~60mm.
While called "Ruby" these can be anything from pale brown through to ruby. Their legs & palps always seem to have ruby highlights, regardless of wing colour.
While males & females have bipectinate antennae, the females have much smaller pectinations. As is typical, the female bodies are much larger (longer & wider) than the males.
We never saw one until May this year and suddenly we've found around 20 males coming to night lights through June & July.
S1, Male, dorsal
S2, Male, dorsal
S3, Male, dorsal
S4, Male, dorsal
S5, Male, size comparison
Males, dorsal
Male, dorsal
Male, dorsal
Male, battered
S1, Male, profile
S2, Male, profile
S1, Male, anterior
S2, Male, anterior
S1, Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Anthelid Moth
:Bombycoidea Anthelidae
Yellow-spotted Anthelid
Anthelidae sp ES1?
Na
em
Found on Acacia hakeoides & Senna artemisioides. Id was arrived at due to the hairyness & triangular face. In future we will raise those we find to improve the id. It's possible S2 is a different species, but we believe it's a late instar.
S2 is about 50mm long, had 5 pairs of prolegs and 3 "real", or thoracic, legs (these are kept to adult, whereas the prolegs are lost). Notice also the spiracles (breathing holes) on it's side, and the mite on it's back. The spiracles are white, vertical ovals just above the prolegs.
The 3 specimens were found in October.
S1, dorsal
S1, anterior
S3, Face
S2, dorsal
S2, profile
S2, Spiracle
S2, Unid'ed Mite
S2, Proleg Feet
S2, Face
S2, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Snout Moth
:Bombycoidea Lasiocampidae
Clear Winged Snout Moth
Genduara subnotata
Na
em
Thank you Peter Marriott for confirming the identification of this species

The caterpillars have variations in colour (from grey to brown).
The adults reflect blue in artificial light that isn't visible in sunlight, which are camera artefacts
Males loose their scales easily to show clear wings. Even the female wings are quite translucent.
Both Males & females have large bipectinate antennae (2 rows of filaments)
On 25th April 2017, we caught specimen 8 and raised her to adult. She was found on Leafless Cherry (Exocarpos aphyllus) and was ~34mm long (ignoring hairy horns). She pupated pretty quickly so was in her final stage as a caterpillar. Notice she is quite white compared with other on-line photo's; which indicates this isn't just wear but a local variation. Possibly due to her food source. Our caterpillars also have a white streak on the back, which is less prominent in most other on-line photo's.
S8: Female, larva
S8: Female, pupa
S8: Female, dorsal
S8: Female, profile
S8: Female, anterior
S8: Female, underwings
S8: Female, translucent wings
S8: Female, forewing patch
S8: Female, ventral
S2: Larva, dorsal
S4: Larva, dorsal, ~22mm
S4: Larva, Head
S4: Larva, ventral
S5: Larva, dorsal, ~23mm
S5: Larva, profile
S1: Female, dorsal, thin
S1: Female, profile
S6: Female, dorsal, ~20mm
S6: Female, profile, wingspan ~32mm
S6: Female, anterior
S6: Female, posterior
S6: Female, ventral
S7: Female, Body, dorsal
S7: Female, Body, profile
S7: Female, Eye + Antenna
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Snout Moth
:Bombycoidea Lasiocampidae
Black Striked Snout Moth
Symphyta MoV2
Na
em
This is figured in Moths of Victoria (MoV) part 1 as Symphyta sp. (2)
The female was larger with head & body ~17mm, wingspan ~38mm. Males have head & body ~15mm, wingspan ~31mm.
While both genders have bipectinate antennae, you can see from the photo's the males have much larger antennae (in proportion to body size) than the females. Also notice the males have a much more contrasting colour scheme with blacks & whites, rather than the more drab greys & browns of the female.
Similar to the Genduara subnotata above, these have thin, translucent wings.
We found 6 specimens (1F, 5M) over 2 days in mid May 2018.
S1: Male, profile, tenting
S2: Male, profile, tenting
S3: Male, profile, tenting
S4: Male, profile, tenting
S5: Female, profile, tenting
S6: Male, profile, tenting
S5: Female, dorsal
S5: Female, dorsal, tenting
S5: Female, Body, profile
S5: Female, Hindwing
S5: Female, under Wings
S5: Female, ventral
S4: Male, dorsal
S3: Male, dorsal, tenting
S4: Male, Body, profile
S3: Male, Hindwing
S4: Male, anterior
S3: Male, ventral
S3: Male, Translucent Wings
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Emperor Moth
:Bombycoidea Saturniidae
Helena Gum Moth
Opodiphthera helena
Na
a
 
Male, Adult, Fore-wings only, dorsal
Male, Adult, Partial Hind-wings, dorsal
Male, Adult, All 4 Wings, dorsal
Male, Adult, front
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Hawk Moth
:Bombycoidea Sphingidae
Convolvulus Hawk Moth
Agrius convolvuli
Na
a
 
Adult Male, profile
Male, fore-wing pattern
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Hawk Moth
:Bombycoidea Sphingidae
Desert Hawk Moth
Hopliocnema brachycera
Na
em
 
S2: Dorsal
S2: Profile
S2: Forewing
S1: Dorsal
S1: Profile
S1: Body + Hindwings
S1: Antenna
S2: Antennae
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Hawk Moth
:Bombycoidea Sphingidae
Australian Striped Hawk Moth
Hyles livornicoides
Na
a
 
Whole, Adult, dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Sun Moth
:Castnioidea Castniidae
Orange-spotted Sun Moth
Synemon parthenoides
Na
a
Other Common NameLink Moth

Similar Species: Klug's Xenica

A very special thank you to Rusty Ryder for taking us to their location and pointing them out to us. In flight they looked very much like the brown butterflies around at the time. If Rusty wasn't there to point them out to us, we wouldn't have noticed them, just thinking they were fast flying brown butterflies.
A most unusual moth in that their antennae are the same as a butterflies, clubbed on the end; plus never sits with it's wings vertically together like butterflies.
As we weren't able to catch one, we have no size information, but they were smaller than the Klug's Xenica. Similar to Synemon sophia (another sun moth species). We suspect the 4th photo shows a female as the body is fatter & not as elongated as the other 3 (possibly males?). Notice the iridescence on the leading edge of the forewings (which disappears easily with a slight tilt) as well as along the trailing edge of all wings.
Dorsal
Iridescence
Under wing
Female? Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Undescribed Wood Moth
Archaeoses ANIC1
Na
em
This is figured on Bold as Archaeoses ANIC1
We've found 8 specimens, varying in size between 14mm up to 21mm head & body length. It seems the larger ones have fatter bodies and suspect them to be females; with the shorter, slimmer ones males.
S1: Male?, dorsal
S2: Male?, dorsal
S2: Male?, profile
S3: Female?, profile
S3: Female?, anterior
S2: Male?, Hindwings + Abdomen
S2: Male?, ventral
S5: Female?, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Tufted Wood Moth
Archaeoses pentasema
Na
em
Other Common NameTufted Goat Moth

Thank you Don Herbison-Evans for helping with the identification of this species

Thank you Peter Marriott for helping with the identification of this species

A most unusual species, about 20mm long.
While it seemed this was a northern species we have now shown it exists in the south; along with A. polygrapha. We had 4 specimens come to a night light over a couple of days.
I asked Don Herbison-Evans for his thoughts and he agrees it looks more like A. pentasema than A. polygrapha. He then gave me some reading to do from the original descriptions by Lower. It was hard going and to be honest the only diagnostic I felt I could be truly certain of as a reliable difference was the antennae "base beneath sharply white". You can see this on both ventral & anterior photo's. The abdomen is generally darker with this one as well.
Surprisingly the ventral abdomenal black stripe wasn't mentioned anywhere.
Peter Marriott (who heads up the "Moths of Victoria" team and has helped us in the past), saw this page and kindly told us that they have records of A. pentasema in North Western Victoria. We share a lot of species with North Western Victoria; suddenly it's not such a surprise to have them at Ellura now
Peter also showed us 3 specimens collected there and ours match up beautifully with those
Further Peter let us know they feed on Myoporum, common trees on Ellura.
We found the adults around the 20th of March.
S2: Dorsal
S1: Profile
S2: Profile
S3: Profile
S4: Profile
S2: Anterior
S2: Hindwings
S1: Abdomen, profile
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Wood Moth
Endoxyla cf amphiplecta
Na
em
Other Common NameGoat Moth

Thank you Ethan Beaver for identifying this species for us

Thank you Mark Ridgeway for helping with the identification of this species

Marie found this large moth being attacked by small ants. Unsure of what was going on, we put her in a container, but couldn't get the ants off (being those tiny minute ones). Brought her back to the van and found eggs in the container. Using tweezers we got the ants off, which gave her some relief. Realising she was gravid took her out into a big pot full of local soil. She immediately started to push her ovipositor into the soil and "rippled" as she pushed eggs out (we assume). Clearly she can't fly, but has wings. A more technical term for reduced winged, flightless insects is "Brachypterous".
Finding the female takes a keen observer and is a rare find, while males are not so rare. A very worn and battered specimen making 100% identification impossible. But given her body & head size of about 60mm and being in SA, E. amphiplecta seems to fit the best. She's not as dirty as she looks; the "dirt" is actually her only remaining scales she has left. Her damaged wings were about 25mm long, body width approx 10mm, giving a wingspan of ~60mm.
Since Ethan id'ed the female, we found a male of what we think is this species. Again, it's difficult to be sure with this genus and the amount of wear they endure; possibly extracting themselves from the pupal tube.
The male has head & body ~26mm, wingspan ~45mm (under half her size).
Female, profile
Female, anterior
Female, Laying eggs
Female, Ovipositor
Eggs, ~1mm long
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, anterior
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Wood Moth
Endoxyla cf coscinophanes
Na
m
Other Common NameGoat Moth

As with all these Endoxylas, id to species is nearly impossible; due to wear & the variable nature of their patters. Please think of our id's as guesses, not factual. We only present the names to help people narrow their own searches.
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Wattle Wood Moth
Endoxyla cf encalypti
Na
em
Other Common NameWattle Goat Moth

Head & body ~73mm, wingspan ~140mm or wider (hard to say as she lost her wing tips)
A number of Endoxyla females are flightless with reduced wings (brachypterous). But with this species the female has fully developed wings; which she has since battered severely.
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, head
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Wood Moth
Endoxyla cf lituratus
Na
em
Other Common NameGoat Moth

Thank you Ethan Beaver for confirming the identification of this species

Head & body ~45mm, wingspan ~90mm.
Ethan suggests it might be one of 3 species: E. lituratus, E. leucomochla or E. encalypti, but without a live specimen it won't be possible to narrow it down further.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile, ~45m
Male, anterior
Male, side, wingspan ~80mm
Male, Shoulders, dorsal
Male, Shoulders, profile
Male, Body, profile
Male, Body, dorsal
Male, Hindwing, under
Male, Antenna & Eye
Male, Antenna
Male, Scales
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Wood Moth
:Cossoidea Cossidae
Small Wood Moth
Sympycnodes cf epicycla
Na
em
Other Common NameSmall Goat Moth

Head & body ~22mm, wingspan ~40mm.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, Hindwing
Male, Abdomen
Male, Antennae
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Fringe-tufted Moth
:Epermenioidea Epermeniidae
Shark moth
Epermenia cf exilis
Na
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Seed Borer
:Gelechioidea Cosmopterigidae
Cosmet Moth
Limnaecia camptosema
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Seed Borer
:Gelechioidea Cosmopterigidae
Lined Cosmet Moth
Macrobathra harmostis
Na
em
 
Profile
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Seed Borer
:Gelechioidea Cosmopterigidae
Tufted Moth
Trachydora sp
Na
em
Other Common NameShark Moth

Estimated wingspan from the flyscreen is ~12mm. A small moth with a number of tufted scales on the back, with orange bases, and the trailing forewings are turned up when at rest.
Profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Black-spotted Moth
:Gelechioidea Ethmiidae
Black-spotted Moth
Ethmia anthracopis
Na
em
 
Profile
Dorsal
Front
Close up of Rear
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Black-spotted Moth
:Gelechioidea Ethmiidae
Black-spotted Moth
Ethmia eupostica
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Twig Moth
:Gelechioidea Hypertrophidae
Satin Twig Moth
Thudaca campylota
Na
em
 
Profile
Dorsal , ~10mm
Dorsal, partial hindwing
Palps
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Brown Concealer Moth
Barea codrella
Na
em
Tiny little moth, it's sitting on a 22" computer screen and the squares in the background are screen pixels.
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Pink-edged Modest Moth
Garrha absumptella
Na
em
About 9mm long, wings eged with a pink ting, with the inner area covered in brown with dark brown dapples.
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Plain Modest Moth
Garrha carnea
Na
em
Head & body ~8mm, wingspan ~24mm.
Like most Garrha, a flattened moth at rest, with very large up-curved palps, large eyes and scales that look like eyelashes above.
A vague dark brown dappled on pale brown appearance.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Pink Modest Moth
Garrha pudica
Na
ema
 
Dorsal
Profile (no flash)
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Hollow Twig Wingia Moth
Hemibela hemicalypta
Na
a
Thank you Ken Harris for identifying this species for us

Using a similar strategy to case moths, the caterpillars of this genera hollow out a twig and carry it around.
As you can see in the photo's they then pupate inside it. The twig is much smaller than the moth that emerges from it.
We found a hollow twig on a small grass tip (thought it was an insect) and realised it was a case glued to the grass, with the grass growing through it. A few days later we found another, thinking it was a case moth, with the end stuck to our poly rainwater tank. We put them in a container and couldn't believe what came out when they emerged.
Body ~7mm, wingspan ~17mm. The twigs are 11-12mm long, ~2mm outside diam & ~1.5mm inside diameter.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Case: profile
Case: Sealed End
Case: After emerging
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Brown House Moth
Hofmannophila pseudospretella
I
a
 
Dorsal, natural colour
Dorsal, sharper
Profile, ~8mm
Ventral, wingspan ~20mm
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Purple Sheen Concealer Moth
Isomoralla curriculata
Na
em
 
Profile, ~13mm
Hindwing
Dorsal
Anterior
Labial Palps
Antenna
Ventral
Outside
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
3 Lined 3 Spotted Moth
Meioglossa pentochra
Na
em
SynonymMeioglossa pentochroa

A small but distinctive moth. We haven't caught one as yet, but estimate to be around 4-5mm. The palps are long and upcurved, with a dark base and light brown top.
Profile
Palps: 2 tone
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Pale Concealer Moth
Philobota partitella
Na
ema
SynonymOecophora partitella

Head & body is ~8mm long, with a wingspan of ~24mm.
We have found specimens in May, Sept & Nov.
Pale Morph, profile
Pale Morph, dorsal
Pale Morph, palps
Pale Morph, ventral, ~9mm
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Dash Dot Concealer Moth
Philobota sp ES1
Na
ema
Head & body is ~8mm long, with a wingspan of ~21mm.
We have found specimens in Apr, July, Aug (most), Oct & Nov.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
Brown Ground Moth
Philobota sp ES2
Na
em
Thank you Peter Marriott for helping with the identification of this species

Thank you Glenn Cocking for identifying this species for us

Head & body ~10mm, wingspan ~13mm.
Peter said "I have just got an email from Glenn Cocking in Canberra about our flightless gelechioid. He says there was a similar image from a local up there and he tracked down some similar things, also from Canberra, in the ANIC collection. They were from the 1940s to the 1960s, all collected in May, unnamed and placed in the Philobota."
Marie found this flightless female, with reduced wings, walking around the floor of the annex. While we knew it was a Gelechioidea from it's upcurved pointy palps, we hadn't relised they had flightless females. After searching extensively on-line we found nothing like it.
Very excited we asked Peter, who responded with the above.
The reduced wings make the legs look very long.
Initially though it was a long legged fly running around.
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, wings
Female, stance
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oecophorid Moth
:Gelechioidea Oecophoridae
White Ground Moth
Philobota sp ES3
Na
em
After Marie found the amazing flightless female above, I couldn't let her have all the fun!
So within a week found one myself (couldn't believe I got so lucky!). Turns out it's a different species.
It looks much larger, but is the same size at about 10mm long and about 13mm wingspan.
We couldn't find any hindwings however. They must exist, but one assumes are so reduced that they are not visible (even though the forewings can be seen clear of the body).
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, anterior
Female, underwings
Female, stance
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Timber Moth
:Gelechioidea Xyloryctidae
Calico Stem-borer Moth
Cryptophasa ochroleuca
Na
ema
 
Whole, Adult, back
Whole, Adult, Antenna
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Bark Moth
Cleora MoV3
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

This is figured in Moths of Victoria (MoV) part 7 as Cleora sp. (3)
We thought this was Cleora displicata, but Marilyn said "more likely to be Cleora sp. (3) in MoV7. It's plainer and paler and has straighter lines than the other possibilities. Sp. (3) is a desert species."
Wingspan ~33mm, head & body length ~13mm.
The under-wing patterns are reminiscent of the red-line Geometrid; without the red-line. But the dorsal wing patterns are quite different.
S1: Dorsal
S2: Dorsal
S1: Profile
S1: Anterior
S1: Antenna
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Thick-lined Bark Moth
Didymoctenia exsuperata
Na
a
 
Dorsal, ~35mm wingspan
Anterior
Antenna
Palps
Palps & Shoulder
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Cryptic Bark Moth
Gastrinodes argoplaca
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for confirming the identification of this species

The hindwings mimic the forewings along the inner margin (body edge), with dark scalloping along the outer margin (trailing edge), but then fade to plain brown in the middle.
Male, dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Grey Bark Moth
Lipogya exprimataria
Na
em
SynonymLarentia exprimataria

About 10mm long and wingspan of about 22mm
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Tufted Bark Moth
Lipogya leucoprosopa
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

About 12mm head & body length, with approx 22mm wingspan.
Most interesting with this species is the raised scale tufts behind the head. Almost impossible to see in dorsal view without a flash reflecting off them. The flash shows them to be metallic and a dark gold colour. In some views it appears to be a single horn, but elsewhere you can see it's two distinct tufts leaning toward each other. As the smaller scales wear down, the tufts become more visible.
S1: Male, dorsal
S2: Male, dorsal
S2: Male, profile
S2: Male, profile closeup
S1: Male, anterior
S1: Male, Abdomen, dorsal
S1: Male, Partial Hindwing
S2: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Undescribed Bark Moth
Lipogya MoV1
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for confirming the identification of this species

This is figured in Moths of Victoria (MoV) part 7 as Lipogya sp. (1), from 2011
It is also figured on Bold as Lipogya EF01, from 2012.
About 11mm long & wingspan about 26mm.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, Two Raised Scale Tufts
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Grey-patch Bark Moth
Scioglyptis cf chionomera
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

About 10mm long & 28mm wingspan.
Males have very large bipectinate (2 rowed) antennae, where as the females have thin thread-like antennae.
We thought this was Scioglyptis loxographa, but Marilyn Hewish kindly advised otherwise. They are quite similar, and MoV (Moths of Victoria) Part 7 has excellent images of the diagnostic differences.
This is a worn specimen making id difficult.
Male: dorsal
Male: underwing
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Looper Moth
Syneora AH06
Na
em
An undescribed species, but still included in the CSIRO database; the initials AH refer to Axel Hausmann.
S1: Male, dorsal, pale morph
S1: Hindwing, pale morph
S1: Perspecitve, with a hoverfly
S2: Male, dorsal, dark morph
S2: Anterior, dark morph
S2: Profile, dark morph
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Boarmiini
Spider-mimicking Moth
Zermizinga sinuata
Na
em
Other Common NameLucerne Looper

Thank you Peter Marriott for identifying this species for us

The flightless females are ~8mm long, wingspan ~10mm; more grey on top, browner underneath. Unlike female clouded footmen, these do have wings. They are reduced and can't produce flight. When we first saw her the fore-wings were resting along the side as well as the hind-wings, but they stayed out the whole time we were photographing. At first we thought we saw a spider on the flyscreen, but were stunned to find it was a moth.
We have found 11 males (so far), in every season, with most over winter (June/July). We've only found 2 females in October.
Males are quite variable in colour. Body & head length is up to ~10mm, wingspan up to ~30mm
We find the process of identification easier to start with a darker one and work back to the paler / worn specimens.
Males also have an unusual "scarf" around the neck, which was most evident on S7, which was also one of the paler specimens. The scarf stands up as the head is bent down.
A more technical term for reduced winged, flightless insects is "Brachypterous".
S10: Fresh Male, dorsal
S9: Male, dorsal
S8: Male, dorsal
S7: Male, dorsal
S6: Male, dorsal
S5: Male, dorsal
S2: Male, antenna
S7: Male, anterior
S7: Male, scarf profile
S7: Male, scarf posterior
S10: Fresh Male, ventral
S1: Female, dorsal
S1: Female, anterior, under
S1: Female, Hindwings, profile
S1: Female, Hindwings, posterior
S1: Female, ventral
S2: Female, dorsal
S2: Female, dorsal (nb extended body)
S2: Female, profile
S2: Female, profile
S2: Female, anterior
S2: Female, antennae
S2: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Lithinini
Bracken Moth
Idiodes apicata
Na
a
 
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Lithinini
Acute Point Moth
Unplaced biplaga
Na
a
SynonymsAzelina biplaga, Metrocampa biplaga

Interesting situation. It's been taken out of the taxon tree because someone believed it didn't belong where it was; but then didn't place it somewhere else.
Dorsal
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Ribbon Cape-moth
Amelora belemnophora
Na
em
Interestingly we have only found males so far. Specimens 3 & 4, shown here, are rather different. S4 is probably fresh, with little scale loss. Whereas S3 is quite worn. Regardless, S4 is a darker morph which also shows in the darker edging under both wings. S3 is also quite a bit smaller at ~10mm body & head length (~26mm wingspan), with S4 at ~12mm body & head length (~32mm wingspan). S7 is in-between and showed it's hindwing rather nicely. We present S3 & S4 fully to help show the normal variations you can see with moths within one species. In profile, you can see the missing scales of S3 make them look quite different.
Don Herbison-Evans had some fascinating insights. He suggests the size difference is due to different food sources and sent us his link Sizing
He then said the emerging adult "pumps blood through its veins to expand the wings. Some pump a little and some pump a lot depending on previous nutrition etc. Once the wings are pumped, they dry, and then the blood in the wing veins sets solid to support the membranes. So some individuals end up with bigger wingspans than others". Fascinating, thanks Don
S3: Male, dorsal
S3: Male, profile
S3: Male, anterior
S3: Male, partial hindwing
S3: Male, ventral
S4: Male, profile
S4: Male, dorsal, wings closed
S4: Male, dorsal, wings spread
S7: Male, partial hindwing
S4: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Banded Cape-moth
Amelora cf ANIC6
Na
em
Similar Species: Broken-banded Cape-moth
This is figured on Bold as Amelora ANIC6
This is very similar to Rusty-banded Cape-moth (Amelora mesocapna), but notice the wing tips are rounded here. With A. mesocapna the wing tips are more pointed.

With many of the Amelora genera, there are very similar species with cross over in appearance. Plus they have not been described on the mainland. Other gerera are also very similar and worth looking at; Androchela, Furcatrox & Loweria (which in time will all be presented in this web-site). As such, many of the names here use "cf" to indicate it "looks like" but can't be sure of it's labelled identity.
Female
Male
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Crescent Cape-moth
Amelora idiomorpha
Na
em
About 11m long & 27mm wingspan.
Males have bipectinate (2 rowed) antennae, where as females have thin thread-like antennae.
Female: dorsal
Female: no flash
Female: profle
Female: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Cape-moth
Amelora sp
Na
em
Common names with moths can often be important descriptors. Here we thought this was Pointed Cape-moth (Amelora demistis). However, the wings aren't pointed, ruling that species out.

NB: none of the identifications on this web site have been determined scientifically (ie by disection). They are based on visual clues, which can be very missleading with invertebrates.
S4: Male, dorsal
S5: Male, dorsal
S1: Female, dorsal
S3: Female, Hindwings
S3: Female, Body
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
White-winged Wedge-moth
Capusa cf cuculloides
Na
em
Head & body ~18mm, wingspan ~32mm.
The lack of black on the trailing edge of the hind wing means this isn't C. senilis
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, anterior
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Grey Crest-moth
Chlenias banksiaria
Na
em
Head & body ~15mm, wingspan ~43mm.
This is a species complex; meaning there are different species in the group that match the known diagnositcs. A revision of the species needs to be done to determine new diagnostics to split the group into separate species.
Both genders have bipectinate antennae, however the pectinations are tiny on the female looking like filiform antennae to the naked eye, or the wrong angle.
The Nisista MoV3, shown below, is our most common crest moth. It's difficult to find the few of these rarer species amongst the hoards of the others.
We found 2 specimens, both in May.
S2, Female, dorsal
S2, Female, dorsal
S2, Female, dorsal
S2, Female, profile
S1, Female, partial Hindwing
S2, Female, anterior
S2, Female, hindwing
S2, Female, underwings
S2, Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Forked Grass-moth
Ciampa arietaria
Na
em
Other Common NamesBrown Pasture Looper, Forked Pasture-moth

A common moth which has some unique characteristics.
The larva curl up at the base of plants looking like new, unfurled leaves.
The adults have a forked horn projection out the front of it's head. It's hairless and not part of the palps; a separate structure.
Males have bipectinate (2 rowed) antennae, where as females have thin thread-like antennae.
Larva 1, dorsal, ~18mm
Larva 1, profile
Larva 1, rear End
Larva 1, eyes & legs
Larva 1, ventral
Larva 2, camoflague, ~12mm
Larva 3, dorsal, ~22mm
Larva 3, posterior
Larva 3, back pattern
Larva 3, eyes
Male, dorsal, ~15mm
Male, hind wings
Male, posterior
Male, Body
Male, Antenna & Horn
Male, Horn + Palp are separate
Male, Horn
Male, Wings
Male, Wings up
Male, Wings wrapped
Male, anterior
Male, Forewing
Male, ventral
Male, ventral (note the Horn)
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Black-edged Geometrid
Cycloprorodes melanoxysta
Na
em
Thank you Andy Young for confirming the identification of this species

This is the first photo on Atlas of this species, and the first sighting in SA since 1891
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Russet Crest-moth
Fisera cf hypoleuca
Na
em
The hindwings trail with a dirty purple band underneath.
A brown speckled cream body.
Males have bipectinate antennae (2 rows of filaments), while females (shown here) have thread-like antennae (filiform).
The front legs are brown, while the rear 4 are white.
A fairly large moth with a wingspan of ~50mm and body & head length of ~16mm
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, Antenna
Female, Horn
Female, under Hindwings
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Crest-moth
Fisera sp ES1
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

We thought this was Amelora nebulosa, but Marilyn indicates it's not an Amelora due to the thoracic crest. Most likely a Fisera sp, but she doesn't recognise it.
Marilyn also said A. nebulosa is a mountain species, and that the way it's holding it's wings is indicitive of Fisera as well.
Male
Female
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Flat Crest-moth
Fisera sp ES2?
Na
em
About 11mm long & 28mm wingspan.
A russet brown colour with a line of irregular spots along the rear of the forewings.
Males have the plumose (bipectinate) antennae, where as females do not (having thread like, filiform antennae).
While this matches the wing patterns of Amelora cryphia, Amelora don't have thoracic crests. As such, must be a different species. Similar in colour to our Fisera hypoleuca, it has a very difference stance. Fisera hypoleuca holds it's wings in a tent arrangement, these hold them more typically flat.
Male: dorsal
Male: profile
Male: Partial Hindwing
Male: anterior
Male: Body
Male: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Brown-marbled Geometrid
Lophosticha psorallodes
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

While we got to genus with these, we couldn't quite assign the correct species. When Marilyn kindly id'ed them for us she said "S6 is obvious. The others are trickier." In her determination she used the marbled background on the forewings (plain with distinct fine lines in S1), the line shapes and the distinctly banded cilia, dark-brown and white.
As a general mothing guide; she also said "wing shape, size and the antennae" need to match. "Forewing cilia, thorax markings, hindwing, underside, can be helpful". Once these are in place, Ted Edwards of the ANIC told her "Follow the lines." By this he means "Trace the shape of each line." Marilyn notes in MoV5, colour forms are not gender based.
"Cilia" refers to the trailing forewing scales (along the termen).
These moths are about 12mm long, with wingspan of about 32mm. The males & females we measured are about the same size. Males have bipectinate antennae; female's are filiform. The hard-to-see upper body is brown (nearly orange) striped. Hindwings are white with an indistinct fuscous trailing band. NB: the scalloped edge (termen) of the hindwing. Ventrally, the body white with dark flecks and a slight ochre tinge darkening toward the posterior. Under the hindwing, there is a vague dark line preceding the terminal dark edge. There also seems to be an ochre patch or line under the forewing (we only managed to see the edge of it).
We've seen adults from May into June.
S1: Male, dorsal
S2: Male, dorsal
S3: Dorsal
S4: Male, dorsal
S5: Male, dorsal
S6: Female, dorsal, tent
S6: Female, dorsal, spread
S7: Female, dorsal
S4: Male, profile
S6: Female, profile
S7: Female, anterior Crest
S6: Female, raised Scales
S6: close up of raised Scales
S6: ochre patch under forewing
S6: Female, Hindwings
S4: Male, ventral
S6: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Smoke-spotted Cape-moth
Loweria capnosticta
Na
em
While it's not very obvious, Loweria sp have a square horn projecting out the front of it's head. This horn is often covered in hairy scales from above, and is best seen ventrally (if you are looking for it).
Male, dorsal
Female, dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Broken-banded Cape-moth
Loweria platydesma
Na
em
Similar Species: Banded Cape-moth  
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Fine-lined Cape-moth
Loweria stenoscia
Na
em
A variable species with thin orange longitudinal marks that form a horizontal line; sometimes with a dark spot on the forewing
S1: Dorsal, dark morph
S2: Dorsal, pale morph
S3: Hind wing, dark morph
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Black-banded Crest-moth
Nisista MoV3
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

This is figured in Moths of Victoria part 5 as Nisista sp. (3)
Maryilyn said "It's tricky because the transverse lines are almost invisible .... I recognised it by the pale grey colour, thoracic crest which goes a long way forward, and the pattern of lines along the outer part of the forewing"
The black blotches on it's forewings are more obvious to the naked eye.
The sharply pointed, forward facing, "mane" can be receded by the moth at will. Possibly a defense mechanism to make it appear more aggressive or larger?
Gender can be differentiated by their antennae, with females being thread-like (filiform) & males being bipectinate.
Don Herbison-Evans has enlightened us that the wonderful mane these animals have is called a "Thoracic Crest", thanks Don
S3: Male, dorsal, wings spread
S3: Male, dorsal, wings wrapped
S3: Male, profile
S3: Male, Head
S3: Male, Partial Body
S3: Male, Mane Receded
S3: Male, ventral
S1: Male, dorsal
S2: Female, dorsal, wings spread
S2: Female, profile, wings wrapped
S2: Female, anterior
S2: Female, partial body
S2: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Fuscous Crest-moth
Paralaea cf ochrosoma
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal & Hindwings
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Red-tracked Geometrid
Plesiolaea maritima
Na
em
About 11mm long & wingspan 28mm.
The female has 3 very distinctive red streaks (2 lateral & one diagonal) on a grey dapled background.
It has a small tuft on each side above the head, and 2 black spots under it's hind wings.
It tends to sit with it's wings wrapped around it's body like a cylinder, but can sit with it's wings out flat.
It plays dead easily making photography of it's underneath nearly impossible.
Thanks to Don Herbison-Evan for confirming our 2nd specimen is the male of this species, based on the forewing tip markings
Female: dorsal
Female: dorsal
Female: profile
Female: anterior
Female: ventral
Male: dorsal
Male: profile
Male: anterior
Male: Body
Male: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Grey-caped Line-moth
Stibaroma melanotoxa
Na
em
 
S1: Male, dorsal
S2: Male, dorsal
S2: Male, partial Hindwings
S2: Male, Body
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Ennominae Nacophorini
Angled Satin Moth
Thalaina angulosa
Na
em
About 16mm long, 40mm wingspan.
Dorsal
Profile
Hind Wings
Head
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Geometrinae
Bitou Tip Moth
Comostolopsis germana
I
em
Other Common NameEmerald Moth

Thank you Andy Young for confirming the identification of this species

Introduced into SA (Adelaides Hills & Murraylands), NSW & other areas from the lates 1980's; to control Boneseed & Horehound. It was thought to have died out in SA, but is seems it didn't.
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Geometrinae
Red-lined Geometer
Crypsiphona ocultaria
Na
em
Other Common NamesRed-lined Geometrid, Redlined Looper Moth

About 40mm wingspan
Male, dorsal
Male, dorsal, Back-lit
Male, ventral
Male, Outside, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Geometrinae
Arid Grey
Hypobapta ANIC3
Na
em
This is figured on Bold as Hypobapta ANIC3
Yet another undescribed species that is known. So annoying for such a magnificent species.
This species varies considerably from most other Hypobapta as the black lines are straighter and angled to the back more. This one also sat with it's forewings almost closed, where as others seem to rest with them fully spread out.
As you can probably tell, our usual ventral shot failed miserably so used a couple of under shots with different views to try to show the underneath wing & body colours. Will update if we find another.
Dorsal
Profile
Hindwings
Anterior
Posterior
Released
Hanging on
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Tan Carpet Moth
Chrysolarentia cryeropa
Na
em
Not recognised on Atlas anymore, they seem to be unplaced in the Hydriomenini tribe.
An unusal species for a moth in that they often hold their wings vertically; perhaps when walking or threatened. It was difficult to get the dorsal shots with the wings held out flat.
The hindwings are a paler copy of the forewings near the trailing & inner margins, fading to plain grey/brown in the middle.
About 9mm long, wingspan about 24mm.
S1: Dorsal
S2: Dorsal
S3: Dorsal
S5: Dorsal
S6: Dorsal
S4: Profile
S1: Wings held vertically
S4: Wings held vertically
S6: Wings held vertically
S6: Antennae
S4: Partial Hindwing
S3: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Gypsum Carpet Moth
Chrysolarentia gypsomela
Na
em
About 8mm long & 23mm wingspan.
So far we have only found females. Males are very similar but have thicker antennae
S1: dorsal
S2: Partial Hindwings
S3: dorsal
S1: underwing
S2: profile
S3: profile
S2: ventral
S3: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Finely Lined Carpet Moth
Chrysolarentia severata
Na
m
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Red-spotted Delicate
Epicyme rubropunctaria
Na
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Pome Looper Moth
Pasiphilodes testulata
Na
em
SynonymChloroclystis testulata
 
Dorsal, wingspan ~23mm
Profile
Anterior
Palps, profile
Palps, dorsal
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Wattle Looper
Phrissogonus laticostata
Na
ema
Other Common NameApple Looper

About 7mm body & head, about 20mm wingspan
Males are easily identified by the costal wing tufts (tufts on the front of the open wing).
Both males & females have very scaloped bodies when viewed in profile. It helps confirm female id, but makes it hard to get dorsal shots fully in focus as the body is considerably higher than the wings.
They often sit upside down; some photo's here have been rotated to make it easier to compare with other moths.
Some moths, like this can be quite variable. It's unusual for us to find green colours on anything at Ellura, however, specimen 9 was the only one found at Ellura with some green in it; compared with Adelaide Hills specimens we found.
NB: the very different body shapes between the 2 male ventral shots. Normally we would consider this a sign of gender variation, but it just goes to show you have to be careful of what one assumes. We have seen similar bloating in moths that have been drowning in puddles, etc.
Primarily October sightings, with a couple around New Year.
S4, Male, dorsal, partial Hindwing
S8, Male, dorsal
S9, Male, dorsal
S8, Male, profile
S9, Male, profile, showing green
S4, Male, costal tuft
S4, Male, ventral
S8, Male, ventral
S2, Female, dorsal
S6, Female, dorsal, deformed
S2, Female, profile
S2, Female, inner margin tufts
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Larentiinae
Vacuaria Carpet Moth
Xanthorhoe vacuaria
Na
em
 
Female
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Streaked Heath Moth
Aglossophanes pachygramma
Na
em
About 8mm (head & body) & 18mm wingspan
Males have mildly bipectinate antennae, females are filiform (thread like).
The hindwing can be plain or have paler lateral stripe matching the forewing. Of the few images available on-line, it appears the females have more of a hindwing stripe than males.
We have only ever seen the adults in the Mallee in March.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Female, partial hindwing
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Dark Leaf Moth
Monoctenia smerintharia
Na
em
A fairly large moth at about 28mm long & 60mm wingspan.
While they can have dark stripes (and/or patches) & vary from russet red to grey, ours didn't have any stripes. It appears the specimens with heavier striping are female.
Note the unusual wing shape with a scaloped outer margin (trailing edge) and shaped more like a Ghost moth (Hepialoidea) than most geometrids.
Male antennae are also unusual as it is monopectinate (ie only one row of filaments comming off the main thread). Most large antennae like this are bipectinate (2 rows) or even tripectinate (3 rows).
Male: dorsal
Male: profile
Male: anterior
Male: Antennae
Male: Hindwings
Male: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Grey Nearcha Moth
Nearcha dasyzona
Na
em
A very pretty moth with a wavy line of black dots, shadowed with a brown band. They have a stunning black face, that isn't always visible.
Males have a couple of elongated patches of long, backward facing scales under the hingwings.
There can be variations in the intensity of the black dots such that they can join into a line. As well as how black the brown shadow is (from darker to ours, to almost non-existant). The same is true for the wavy line on the hindwings.
Wingspan ~36mm & body & head ~13mm.
According to Peter Merriot, in Moths of Victoria, digital supplement "Comparision of Nearcha", the pattern of this tuft is diagnostic. His images are of the left hindwing, with the head pointing up; otherwise the images match
S1: Male, dorsal
S1: Male, Wings Closed
S2: Male, Showing some Body
S1: Male, profile
S1: Male, Head, dorsal
S1: Male, Antenna
S2: Male, Black Face
S2: Male, Black Face Hidden
S2: Male, Scale Patch
S2: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Bronze Nearcha
Nearcha sp
Na
em
Thank you Peter Marriott for identifying this species for us

Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

Marilyn kindly let us know this was not Amelora catacris, and that emergence time/month was an important factor in moth identification. Peter then said "... Taxeotis only have threadlike antennae - females and males - see MoV 4 on page 15. So it is 99% likely to be Nearcha - males pectinate on both sides and females threadlike". As such, it is most likely an undescribed species.

We found & captured 15 specimens of this species on 10 Sept 2017; equally males & females. They were quite variable and photo artefacts played havoc. eg notice the white spots hide easily depending on the camera/lighting angle. The bronze colour also washed out easily in flash light.
The females we found appeared to have stronger markings than males; this may not always be the case.
These beautiful moths range from plain, pale brown to a magic bronze colour. We have grouped the photo's by male & female, to show differences between specimens.
Males are about 10mm long, with wingspan of 25mm. Female bodies are a bit shorter at about 8mm long, but with the same wingspan as the male. The under-wings don't appear much different between the genders, but the ventral shots show the significant difference in the body shapes; with males being long & thin, females short & fat.
S6: Male, dorsal
S9: Male, dorsal
S13: Male, dorsal
S15: Male, dorsal
S16: Male, dorsal
S17: Male, dorsal
S17: Male, Hindwings
S17: M, Hindwing inner margin
S9: Male, profile
S16: Male, antenna
S17: Male, ventral
S5: Female, dorsal
S7: Female, dorsal
S10: Female, dorsal
S11: Female, dorsal
S12: Female, dorsal
S14: Female, dorsal
S14: Female, artefact
S7: Female, Hindwings
S7: Female, Body, profile
S7: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Spring Taxeotis
Taxeotis perlinearia
Na
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Taxeotis
Taxeotis sp
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Oenochrominae
Orange-spotted Taxeotis
Taxeotis xanthogramma
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Sterrhinae
White-edged Wave
Idaea costaria
Na
ema
These moths are very distinctive with a pale band across the leading edge of their wings and brown-red edging to the trailing edges of all wings.
These are very similar to Idaea inversata. These have the pale stripe between the antennae, where as I. inversata has a single coloured head with no stripe.
Dorsal, wingspan ~17mm
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Sterrhinae
Lydia's Wave Moth
Scopula lydia
Na
ema
Males have antennae filaments, and are browner with less distinct markings than females.
S1: Female, dorsal, wingspan ~15mm
S1: Female, profile
S2: Female, Hindwings, dorsal
S3: Male, dorsal
S3: Male, Antenna
S3: Male, profile
S3: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Sterrhinae
Varied Wave Moth
Scopula optivata
Na
ema
Similar Species: Wavy Noctuid

These seem quite fragile. Of the 3 specimens we've photographed, all have had damaged wings. The specimen here was the worst, but also the only one we captured to get the size & ventral detail.
S2: Dorsal, ~25mm wingspan
S1: Dorsal
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Geometer
:Geometridae Sterrhinae
Plantain Moth
Scopula rubraria
Na
ema
Note the dark and white striped antennae in this species, it's quite noticable. Males have reasonably obvious filaments.
S4: Male, Light Morph, dorsal
S3: Female, Light Morph, dorsal
S1: Female, Dark Morph, dorsal
S2: Female, Light Morph, anterior
S1: Female, Dark Morph, anterior
S1: Female, Dark Morph, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Leaf Miner
:Gracillarioidea Gracillariidae
Blackbutt Leaf Miner
Acrocercops laciniella
Na
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Swift Moth
:Hepialoidea Hepialidae
Ghost Moth
Abantiades marcidus
Na
ma
 
Female, dorsal
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Swift Moth
:Hepialoidea Hepialidae
Chequered Ghost Moth
Fraus polyspila
Na
em
Other Common NameChequered Fraus

About 13mm long & 32mm wingspan.
Typically Ghost moths are amoung the larger moths in Australia, spanning the width of a large hand. So it was a complete surprise to us to realise this little moth was in the same family as the giants

Apparantly the scales fall off very easily so on-line photo's look very different to each other as the pattern dissapears.
Thanks Ethan for letting us know the one we found is a male.
Male: dorsal
Male: profile
Male: anterior
Male: on finger
Male: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Swift Moth
:Hepialoidea Hepialidae
Rain Moth
Trictena atripalpis
Na
em
Other Common NamesSwift or Waikerie Moth & Bardee, Bardy or Bardi Grub

Very large moth
Our male was about 55m long, with a wingspan of about 115mm
Dark grey with light grey lightening pattern on the wings
After discovering the horn on the Forked Grass moth recently, we wanted to clearly show the projections out the front of this species were in fact part of the palps, and not an additional appendage.
S1: Male, dorsal
S3: Male, Partial Hindwing
S1: Male, profile
S1: Male, Palps
S3: Male, Palps
S3: Male, Palps
S1: Male, ventral
S2: Female, profile, rotated
S2: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Wasp Moth
Amata aperta
Na
em
Other Common NameDay-flying Tiger Moth

Similar Species: Wasp Moth
Thank you Peter Marriott for identifying this species for us

We haven't seen them on Ellura until this one flew past one evening. A week later and we were happily inundated with them.
These species within the Amata genus are very difficult to distinguish; with even experts & the Australian National Insect Collection have trouble. They have a lot of varition within species, with A. Aperta generally having more orange head, and the area on the wing between the outside 2 patches being oranged, or an another blotch of orange. They all have orange patches on wings, with Black & orange striped body and a longitudinal orange stripe on each leg.
Males are larger & have a thinner body, compared with females.
Male: All wings showing
Male: Whole
Mating: Female left, Male right
Head, iso
Head, dorsal
Head, profile
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Wasp Moth
Amata xanthura
Na
em
SynonymSyntomis xanthura

Other Common NameDay-flying Tiger Moth

Similar Species: Wasp Moth
Thank you Peter Marriott for identifying this species for us

These tend to have orange shoulders and black head, compared with Amata aperta
Male: Whole
Male: Whole
Head & Shoulders
Ventral
Profile
Face & Stiped Legs
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Clouded Footman
Anestia ombrophanes
Na
ema
While the male moth is rather drab with his wings closed, the interest starts to peak when you see his wings open; such an orange flash. The caterpillars feed on lichen. Then to discover that both male & female caterpillars make their cocoon out of their own hair. They then pupate inside this and their gender can be determined at this early stage. The female is an incredible array of pink, black & white AND she doesn't have any wings when she emerges. She waits for a male to fly to her. They mate and then she deposits her eggs on the hairs of her cocoon. She then spends the rest of her short life tending to her eggs. What an interesting species!
A more technical term for wingless insects is "Apterous". It's hard to know if shes wingless, or has reduced wings, which would make her "Brachypterous".
Caterpillar
Male Pupa, new
Male Pupa
Male Pupa Case, empty
Female Pupa
Adult Male, dorsal, wingspan ~25mm
Adult Male, profile
Adult Male, ventral
Adult Female, dorsal
Adult Female, anterior
Adult Female with Eggs
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Cryptic Snout Moth
Arrade destituta
Na
a
About 7mm long with a wingspan of about 22mm.
A stunning moth with various tufts giving it real presence, yet it's quite small.
Found in November.
Dorsal
Profile
Forwing
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Cryptic Crest Moth
Brachycyttara crypsipyrrha
Na
em
A very rare moth, originally only found in WA. MoV8 reports it has since been discovered in SA (once), Vic (once) & NSW.
The 1st thing we noticed about this moth was the irregular "gold" line running laterally near the back of the forewing. It's not so obvious with the camera and turns out to be a pale line with orange highlights, giving it an illusion of "gold".
About 18mm long with a wingspan of about 35mm.
The males have many more lines along the trailing edge of the forewing (outer margin), but both have filiform (thread like) antennae.
The forewings are scalloped along the outer margin and have 3, equally spaced, lateral, pale lines spattered with orange flecks. The shape of the palps is also quite unusual.
The hindwings have a spot in the middle. It's not obvious unless you look for it.
The antennae base and legs joints are all highlighted by orange scales. Those at the antennae base almost look like coloured eyelashes

We found our single specimen near the end of June.
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, hindwing
Female, forewing
Female, head & palps
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Doubleday's Footman
Castulo doubledayi
Na
a
The female was about 8-9mm long with wingspan of about 28mm.
Males have bipectinate antennae, females have filiform.
The only 2 specimens we found were very worn & damaged. The white marks on the males forewing, eg, are damage not patterns. Fortunately one was male & one female to show the differences.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, head
Male, hindwings
Male, ventral
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, hindwings
Female, under forewings
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Old Lady Moth
Dasypodia selenophora
Na
ema
Other Common NameGranny Moth (but this can refer to other species as well)

These moths have a propensity for buildings. We often find them in the patio, and when they can't get out they die which is rather sad. Fortunately they are very common and can be found everywhere in spring & autumn.
A beautiful large moth with a large "eye" on each forewing. The proper name for each "eye" is Reniform Stigma (thanks Mark
.
These Stigma are useful protection from predators that think twice before attacking such a huge "face".
They are quite shiny and perceived colours vary considerably depending on lighting angles & intensity.
They have a zig zag pattern on both fore & hindwings, but the forewing lines are much more well defined. Both wings also have a trailing line of small white dots at the top of each fold in the wing.
Underneath each wing also has a black spot (with a couple of black lines/patches on each side).
The orange ring surrounding the Reniform Stigma does seem to vary in thickness, as does the inner pale blue/white line.
Wingspan is ~80mm
Larva, dorsal
Larva, profile
Larva, eyes
Larva, feet, profile
Larva, and more feet
Larva, face
Larva, ventral
Dorsal, thin orange ring
Dorsal, thick orange ring
Light angle colour variations
Profile
Anterior
The "Eye", called a Reniform Stigma
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Spotted Noctuid Moth
Diatenes gerula
Na
ema
 
Dorsal, ~40mm wingspan
Anterior
Posterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Orange Noctuid Moth
Diatenes igneipicta
Na
ema
 
Dorsal, wingspan ~35mm
Profile
Head, dorsal
Ventral
S2: Anterior
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Lichen Double-spot Moth
Epicyrtica cf lathridia
Na
em
About 9mm long & 22mm wingspan.
We found these very difficult to differentiate with other Double-spot moths, so many lines to compare.
One difference that stands out with this species vs the other Epicyrtica we've published is their very hairy look around the legs.
We found 2 on one night in April this year.
Male, dorsal
Female, dorsal
Male, profile
Female, profile
Male, ventral
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Tufted Double-spot Moth
Epicyrtica cf MoV3
Na
em
This is figured in Moths of Victoria (MoV) part 8 as Epicyrtica sp. (3)
About 11mm long & wingspan 28mm.
While it appears to have 3 tufts, the front two are from the head & body, while the hind 'tuft' is actually created by the edge of the forewings.
We have found 3 specimens in April & May.
S1, dorsal
S2, dorsal
S3, dorsal
S3, profile
S2, partial hindwing
S3, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Wavy Noctuid
Ericeia subsignata
Na
em
Similar Species: Varied Wave Moth

Very similar to the Varied Wave Moth (Scopula optivata), but the head is different with large palps.
Dorsal, wingspan ~25mm
Profile
Anterior
Forewing, ventral
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Inconspicuous Eublemma
Eublemma inconspicua
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Senecio Moth
Nyctemera amicus
Na
ema
Thank you Don Herbison-Evans for identifying this species for us

Mature larvae (shown here) are about 13mm long, generally black with 3 orange longitudinal stripes. Young instars are black & white with no orange stripe, nor tufts (but still hairy). Intermediate instars have black & orange with areas of white patches which confuse the overall pattern. They are very hairy with 2 tufts of hair at the front which look like antennae or horns. You can see the hairs also have barbs/hairs on them. They feed on various varieties of senecio (hence their species common name)
A day flying moth, the adult wings are mainly black with white blotches making a diagonal, thick line on the wings. Their bodies are orange & black horizontally striped (leading to the "tiger moth" common name of the family). They have orange highlights behind the head and on the wing tips (cilia).
Male & female adults can be differentiated by their antennae. While both are bipectinate (2 rows of filaments), the male pectinations (filaments) are longer and more spread than the females; as shown in the photo's.
Females have a wingspan of about 44mm, and are around 15mm long. We haven't measured a male as yet.
We have seen adults in April, May, June, August & November.
S2: Pupa Case
S9: Larva, dorsal
S9: Larva, profile
S9: Larva, tufts & hairs
S12: Male, dorsal
S11: Female, dorsal
S11: Female, hindwings
S11: Female, Abdomen, dorsal
S8: Female, dorsal
S8: Female, profile
S8: Female, anterior
S8: Female, antenna
S11: Female, Palps, dorsal
S11: Female, Palps, ventral
S8: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Gold Threaded Panty Moth
Pantydia MoV1
Na
em
This is figured in Moths of Victoria, part 8, as Pantydia sp. (1). It is also on Bold as Pantydia ANIC4.
About 17mm long with wingspan of about 38mm.
The ventral pattern on the hindwing separates this from other Pantydia species.
Males have slightly thicker antennae and are more difficult to id (vary more) than the females; which (females) also have a thicker body.
Interestingly this perfect specimen (very fresh?) shows a medial spot under each hindwing which isn't very obvious in other resources.
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, anterior
Female, stance
Female, hindwing
Female, Gold "Thread"
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Edward's Praxis
Praxis edwardsii
Na
em
Head & body ~16mm, wingspan ~45mm.
Came to a night light in July.
Dorsal
Profile
Palps
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Black and White Tiger Moth
Spilosoma glatignyi
Na
a
Other Common NameWoollybear Caterpillar

About 21mm body & head length, about 55mm wingspan.
This is one of those species that "plays dead" very well.
A spectacular moth with bright orange upper-body, legs & highlights. The upper-body orange is interrupted with a transverse black line/blotch on each segment; with a white tail tuft.
The wings are black or brown & white, with varying patterns. The under body is white with 5 dashed black longitudinal lines/blotches.
Males & females are very difficult to separate. While females are generally larger, this is not always so (both male & female specimens shown here have the same wingspan, with the male having a slightly longer body). They both have bipectinate antennae. The male pectinations, however, are slightly longer. Of the few ventral photo's we can find, the females are missing a front, central black blotch as well. This could be a random colour variation, like the wings. We would be keen on hearing from anyone that can link/send ventral photo's of females with all the black blotches to us

We have sighted the adults in April only.
S1, Male, profile
S1, Male, Tail
S2, Larva, dorsal
S2, Larva, face
S2, Larva, profile
S2, Larva, Legs
S3, Female, dorsal
S3, Female, profile
S3, Female, Head
S3, Female, Abdomen, profile
S3, Female, ventral
S4, Male, dorsal
S4, Male, profile
S4, Male, Abdomen, profile
S4, Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Desert Footman
Thallarcha rhaptophora
Na
em
 
S1: Dorsal
S2: Dorsal, ~5mm
S2: Profile, wingspan ~18mm
S2: Anterior
S2: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tiger Moth
:Noctuoidea Erebidae
Halgania Moth
Utetheisa pulchelloides
Na
ema
SynonymUtethesia pulchelloides

Other Common NameHeliotrope Moth

About 13mm long, with a wingspan of about 35mm.
Very colourful moth close up, but the colours are not visible when flying. Males & females cannot normally be distinguished. At rest it wraps it's wings around the body, making it very difficult to get a full wing pattern from one side. It's best to get profile from both sides and dorsal shots to see the whole forewing.
Another insect with a common name associated with a weed, but is a native insect. It's larvae eat Boraginaceae, with the most dominant plant in the family on Ellura being Halgania
White moth, with black and red swatches (almost an art deco fabric design). There are 5 red marks along the inner margin (but they can be grey or even missing) that match the 5 red marks along the costa. The size of the red marks varies considerably. They can also join together or be very segregated.
Has varying degrees of mustard highlights around the head & shoulder.
There is another very similar moth, the Salt and Pepper Moth (Utetheisa lotrix), that is usually further north.
We have found adults in Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Oct & Nov.
Larva, dorsal
Larva, head
Adult, profile 'normal'
Dorsal, large, red, joined patches
Dorsal, large, red, joined patches
Rear 2 patches are grey not red
Dorsal, 2nd red patch is missing
Dorsal, 5th red patch is grey
Hindwings
Face
Drinking
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Euteliidae
Brown Eutelin Moth
Pataeta carbo
Na
em
Thank you Peter Marriott for confirming the identification of this species

Thank you Dr Ken Walker for confirming the identification of this species

This was the 1st record for SA on the Atlas of Living Australia
Dorsal
Front
Rear
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tussock Moth
:Noctuoidea Lymantriidae
White Tussock Moth
Acyphas chionitis
Na
ema
 
Female, profile
Female, dorsal
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tussock Moth
:Noctuoidea Lymantriidae
Omnivorous Tussock Moth
Acyphas semiochrea?
Na
ema
 
Larva 1, dorsal
Larva 1, head
Larva 1, profile
Larva 2, perspective
Larva 3, dorsal
Larva 3, profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tussock Moth
:Noctuoidea Lymantriidae
Tussock Moth
Acyphas sp?
Na
a
We can't be sure which species these larva belong to, but are confident there is more than one species in these specimens shown here.
Larva 1, dorsal
Larva 2, dorsal
Larva 2, profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Spotted Owlet Moth
Athetis tenuis
Na
em
About 12mm long with 25mm wingspan. Filiform antennae, with no visible difference between the genders we can find.
A common moth found all over the country. Difficult to id though as it's relatively plain looking and very shiny in a camera flash.
In the middle of their forewings they have a small dark spot or line within a slightly pale longitudinal line which can also have some pale spots toward the rear. In the right light you can see an irregular lateral row of dots about 3/4 along the forewing. In the same light, some irregular spots form another zigzag line about 1/4 the way along the forewing.
The feature that stands out the most are the 3 scale tufts on the back of the thorax that look like a shield. These are not clear on pinned specimens but can be seen in the photo's here. This scale formation is not unique to this species, but did help in collating different specimen photo's.
The ventral view shows an interesting pattern under the hindwings (which are quite a bit shorter than the forewings). They are pale off white, with dark speckles on the leading edge, fading to plain quickly towards the inner margin.
Note the robust palps and huge hind legs! For such a plain moth, it has some very interesting features

We have found them in Mar, May & Sep.
S1: dorsal
S2: dorsal
S3: dorsal
S4: dorsal
S5: dorsal
S6: dorsal
S6: profile
S6: angle showing spots
S6: partial hindwing
S6: ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Red Flecked Owlet Moth
Hypoperigea tonsa
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Mini Owlet Moth
Mataeomera mesotaenia
Na
em
 
Dorsal, ~7mm
Camera artefacts
Profile, wingspan ~16mm
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Black Noctuid
Neumichtis cf nigerrima
Na
ema
Thank you Cathy Powers for confirming the identification of this species

Cathy said "The black moth caught in the spider web has all the lines and markings of Neumichtis nigerrima".
However, there is an undescribed species that looks the same with bi-pectinate antennae. Neumichtis nigerrima only has thread like antennae. So if you find a moth like this with bi-pectinate antennae, please let us know here, or contact Cathy. She'd be very keen to see it. We'll be keeping our eye out too

We weren't aware of the antennae variations, so didn't photograph them. As such can't be sure of the species identification.
The "cf" notation we use here & elsewhere on this web site translates to "looks like".
Caught in a web
Profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Green Cutworm
Neumichtis saliaris
Na
a
Thank you Cathy Powers for identifying this species for us

The common name is based on the green caterpillar. Originally we identified this as N. archephanes They are an incredibly variable species going from this dark blue morph through to very pale brown. The subterminal line is the key, and on N. archephanes it's straight, not curved like this one. The subterminal line is the line between the blue band at the back of the forewings and the brown brown area torwards the middle of the forewings.
Dorsal
Profile
Front
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Spotless Proteuxoa
Proteuxoa acontoura
Na
em
SynonymThoracolopha acontoura

About 11mm long & 30mm wingspan.
Based on body shape, we assume females have an ochre tint to the posterior end of their abdomen. What we assume to be males are off-white. There didn't appear to be any other variations we could see.
They have a faint racing stripe behind their head, which is not visible on pinned samples as the pin-head interferes.
We weren't able to capture their satin texture in photographs. An elegant moth to the naked eye. And due to the lack of cresents & spots, not obviously a proteuxoa.
While Thoracolopha acontoura is the currently accepted name (as of late 2017), we use the names on the ALA which hasn't caught up yet and still lists this under Proteuxoa.
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Male, dorsal
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Undescribed Proteuxoa
Proteuxoa ANIC6
Na
em
This is figured on Bold as Proteuxoa ANIC6.
About 10mm long with wingspan of about 25mm.
S1, dorsal
S2, dorsal
S3, dorsal
S1, profile
S1, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Ragged-banded Owlet Moth
Proteuxoa atmoscopa
Na
em
SynonymThoracolopha atmoscopa

Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

About 10mm long with about 25mm wingspan.
Marilyn told us "Proteuxoa was split into two genera. Proteuxoa and Thoracolopha, in a publication by Bobbie Hitchcock et al", in late 2017.
Many of these Noctuid's are very shiny and difficult to photograph. We've been experimenting with turning the flash off and using external light sources to highlight the lines and reduce glare. You can see the differences here. The no flash photo's are out of focus more, little depth of field and very yellow. Cathy Powers has shown us a home made diffuser made from foam which we are now experimenting with to improve these issues while reducing flash glare / sparkle.
We found 2 specimens in March & April.
While Thoracolopha atmoscopa is the currently accepted name (as of late 2017), we use the names on the ALA which hasn't caught up yet and still lists this under Proteuxoa.
S1, dorsal
S1, dorsal, no flash
S2, dorsal
S2, dorsal, no flash
S2, dorsal, greyed
S1, profile
S2, head
S1, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Noctuid Moth
Proteuxoa cinereicollis
Na
em
This matches exactly to a specimen on Bold.
Profile
Dorsal
Head
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Y-barred Noctuid Moth
Proteuxoa epiplecta
Na
em
 
Dorsal, ~11mm
Profile
Head
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Red Blooming Proteuxoa
Proteuxoa florescens
Na
em
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for confirming the identification of this species

The male was about 12mm long & 29mm wingspan. Females were slightly larger at about 13mm long & 30mm wingspan.
Male, dorsal
Male, Wings Spread
Male, profile
Male, Head
Male, ventral
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Sun Spot Proteuxoa
Proteuxoa heliosema
Na
em
About 11mm long & 28mm wingspan.
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Noctuid Moth
Proteuxoa restituta ?
Na
em
 
Dorsal, ~17mm
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Red Spotted Noctuid Moth
Proteuxoa rubripuncta
Na
a
Thank you Marilyn Hewish for confirming the identification of this species

Found dead. About 20mm long & 25mm wingspan.
Dorsal
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Herringbone Caterpillar
Proteuxoa sp ES1 ?
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile, legs
Head
Side
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Herringbone Caterpillar
Proteuxoa sp ES2 ?
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral, ~30mm
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Owlet Moth
Proteuxoa sp ES3
Na
em
We thought this was Proteuxoa marginalis, but Marilyn Hewish kindly advised otherwise.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Undescribed Owlet Moth
Proteuxoa sp ES4
Na
em
SynonymThoracolopha

Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

Head & body length ~10mm, wingspan ~22mm.
We thought this was Agrotis porphyricollis, but Marilyn kindly advised us of the correct id.
While Thoracolopha is the currently accepted name (as of late 2017), we use the names on the ALA which hasn't caught up yet and still lists these under Proteuxoa.
All four female specimens were found on one night, 2nd April 2018
S2: Female, dorsal
S3: Female, dorsal
S4: Female, dorsal
S2: Female, hindwings
S3: Female, profile
S3: Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Herringbone Caterpillar
Proteuxoa sp ES5 ?
Na
em
This specimen was about 17mm long.
Any larvae (caterpillars) we have identified without raising to adults we tag with a question mark, like here. As such, id is quite unreliable, a best guess of what it will turn into.
From now on we will capture all caterpillars we find and haven't id, raise them and post photo's showing the various stages. Perhaps even manage to breed them to get male, female & egss; there by linking all forms together.
Caterpillars can vary in shape & colour as they grow in roughly 5 stages (instars). It'll also be interesting to see any variations between male & female larvae.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Black Crescent Owlet Moth
Proteuxoa sp ES6
Na
em
SynonymThoracolopha

Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

While Thoracolopha is the currently accepted name (as of late 2017), we use the names on the ALA which hasn't caught up yet and still lists these under Proteuxoa.
Marilyn said "This is labelled as an undescribed Proteuxoa species in the Aust. National Insect Collection. My research has found 25 Vic. specimens from the west of the state. It can be distinguished from P. verecunda by the very broad black crescent mark and the lack of wavy cross-lines on the forewing."
About 12mm long with winspan of about 28mm.
As both genders of Proteuxoa & thoracolopha have filiform antennae, it makes determining their genders more difficult. The body shapes, shown here, are used to guess the different genders.
Male, dorsal
Male, ventral
Female, profile
Female, anterior
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Acronictinae
Black Spotted Owlet Moth
Proteuxoa verecunda
Na
em
SynonymThoracolopha verecunda

Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

We thought this was Proteuxoa flexirena, but Marilyn kindly advised us of the correct id.
While Thoracolopha verecunda is the currently accepted name (as of late 2017), we use the names on the ALA which hasn't caught up yet and still lists this under Proteuxoa.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Agaristinae
Grass Day Moth
Apina callisto
Na
em
Other Common NamePasture Day Moth

Thank you Don Herbison-Evans for helping with the identification of this species

We Id'ed this species from the first photo of a Larva some time ago. Unfortunately we don't keep records of this (still learning). But then we recently found the adult and was double checking on Don Herbison-Evan's site when we realised our larva looks different to the photo's on his site.
We almost pulled the photos from our site, but thought we'd ask the man himself.
Don is incredibly helpful and has a reputation of being a nice bloke. So he happily responded back with

"Yes those look like the 3 prothorax stripes of an Apino callisto caterpillar. Of course the real test is to rear it to the adult moth and compare that with the holotype. Individual caterpillars do vary in colour, depending on instar, food, microclimate, genetics, etc (like humans do)."

There's a big lesson here. We can't rely on Larva for a confident id. So in future we will always put a "?" against a species based on larva alone. Also, to re-iterate, identification from photos alone is fraught with difficulty & errors

Notice the strange horn extrusion on it's face.
While larvae vary greatly in size, these are ~45-50mm long. The female is ~25mm long & ~55mm wingspan
Larva1, Whole
Larva1, Head & Prothorax
Larva1, Yellow Spots on Rear
Larva2, profile
Larva2, Prothorax
Larva2, Rear Yellow Spot
Larva2, 3 Breathing Holes
Larva2, Front "Real" Legs
Larva2, Rear "Prolegs"
Larva2, 2 Middle Pair of Prolegs
Larva2, Dashed Stripes on the Back
Larva3&4, head of 1 & tail of the other
Larva3&4, following each other
Larva, ventral
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, Head & Antenna
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, profile, wings up
Female, Hindwings
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Agaristinae
Mistletoe Moth
Comocrus behri
Na
ma
Similar Species: Hibbertia Moth  
Wings up, anterior
Dorsal
Profile
Whole, anterior
Face
Anterior
Proboscis
Ventral, size, len ~25mm, wingspan ~70mmmiley">
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Agaristinae
Crimson Beauty
Cremnophora angasii
Na
em
About 14mm long & 35mm wingspan.
The pink colours in this species are quite spectacular, even it's palps are pure pink!
A black & white moth, with a row of crimson spots along the outer margin (trailing) of it's forwings. These spots are visible underneath, but are missing on it's hindwings.
It's front legs also have splashes of crimson around the joints.
To add to the contrast, the antennae are a pale orange / yellow colour.
The female has thread like antennae (as shown here) while males have bipectinate antennae.
Female, dorsal, wings spread
Female, dorsal, wings tented
Female, profile
Female, Body
Female, anterior
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Agaristinae
Crow Moth
Cruria donowani
Na
m
Similar Species: Hibbertia Moth
While this photo was taken in NSW, it's included here as it does occur in SA in the semi-arid evirons and is a good comparison to it's cousins the Mistletoe Moth & Hibbertia Moth
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Agaristinae
Hibbertia Moth
Phalaenoides glycinae
Na
a
Other Common NameGrapevine Moth

Similar Species: Mistletoe Moth  
Adult, profile
Adult, ventral
Larva
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Heliothinae
Ruby Owlet Moth
Australothis rubrescens
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Heliothinae
Australian Native Budworm
Helicoverpa sp
Na
ema
Other Common NamesCorn Ear Worm, Tomato Grub, Tobacco Budworm or Cotton Bollworm

This photo could be either H. armigera or H. punctigera. Without seeing the hindwings (looking for a pale patch in the trailing black band in H. armigera), it's not possible to differentiate.
Back
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Heliothinae
Lesser Budworm
Heliothis punctifera
Na
em
 
S1: Orange Morph, dorsal
S1: Orange Morph, body
S1: Orange Morph, profile
S2: Orange Morph, Hindwings
S3: Brown Morph, dorsal
S4: Faded, dorsal
S4: Faded, anterior
S4: Faded, profile
S4: Faded, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Bogong Moth
Agrotis infusa
Na
ema
~22mm long, wingspan ~45mm
S2: Female, Dark Morph, dorsal
S3: Male, dorsal
S1: Male, Hindwings
S4: Male, Light Morph, dorsal
S4: Male, profile
S4: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Brown Cutworm Moth
Agrotis munda
Na
ema
~16mm long, wingspan ~36mm
Male 1, dorsal
Male 1, Antenna
Male 2, profile
Male 3, posterior
Female 1, dorsal
Female 1, dorsal
Female 2, dorsal
Female 10: dorsal
Female 1, profile
Female 3, profile
Female 1, anterior
Female 2, anterior
Female 2, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Tasmanian Cutworm Moth
Dasygaster padockina
Na
ema
S1 was about 17mm long with wingspan of about 44mm.
It's hard to believe these two specimens are the same species. Thanks to Peter Merriott for identifying the 2nd specimen for us
Quite possibly a species complex.
Notice the orange side tufts in S1, that were visible to the eye. On closer inspection we notice more orange scales on the face.
S1, dorsal
S2, dorsal
S1, profile
S1, tufts
S1, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Saltbush Cutworm
Ectopatria horologa
Na
em
The large number of photos of this species is to show the large variety of patterns speciemens can appear to have due to fading / wear.
It's not clear why the ventral photo's fat & thin bodies. It's possibly due to different genders, or perhaps one is gravid (pregnant).
They are ~18mm long, with wingspan ~40mm.
S1: Dorsal
S2: Dorsal, very worn
S3: Dorsal
S4: Dorsal
S5: Dorsal
S6: Dorsal
S1: Hindwings
S1: Anterior
S1: Profile
S1: Camouflage
S1: Ventral, fatter
S2: Ventral, thinner, worn above
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Pale Cutworm
Ectopatria virginea?
Na
em
Thank you Peter Marriott for identifying this species for us

Peter said it's a tentative id at this stage.
The only specimen we found, in October, was already dead and appears to have been killed by a parasite in it's side (see the ventral view).
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Grass Armyworm
Leucania stenographa
Na
em
SynonymMythimna loreyimima

Other Common NameSugar Cane Armyworm

About 15mm long, with wingspan about 34mm.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Leg Spines
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Armyworm
Mythimna convecta
Na
em
 
Dorsal, ~22mm
Dorsal
Partial hindwings
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Noctuinae
Southern Armyworm
Persectania ewingii
Na
em
Notice we have both young & old specimens here. The old ones show wear and make for good comparisons of how different specimens of the same species can be, even with out any colour morphs. Not the ventral shots are worn as much as the top of the head.
Differences between the genders is difficult. Females have black dash lines on their body and are slightly larger (23mm to 18mm for the males). Males have plain bodies, their antennae filaments are slightly longer, but not hugely so and are smaller.
S2: Female, dorsal
S3: Female, profile
S3: Female, Body
S1: Female, anterior
S3: Female, ventral, younger
S1: Female, ventral, older, ~23mm
Antenna comparison
S5: Male, dorsal
S6: Male, profile, ~18mm
S5: Male, side, above
S5: Male, Body
S5: Male, Hindwings
S5: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Owlet moth
:Noctuoidea Noctuidae Plusiinae
Green Looper
Plusiinae sp?
Na
a
Thank you Don Herbison-Evans for confirming the identification of this species

Marie found this in a lettuce bought from a shop in April.
It was damaged and died 24 hrs later when we tried to raise it.
Plusiinae is a sub-family, and may be raised to a family status in the future. We were worried it was a new invasion of an exotic, Silver Y (Autographa gamma), yet to be found in Australia
Don said "As a green smooth semi-looper feeding on Asteraceae: I agree that it is likely in Plusiinae, but sadly the larvae like this of species in Plusiinae are variable and nearly indistinguishable."
Profile
Mandibles & Eyes
Feet
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tuft Moth
:Noctuoidea Nolidae
Pale Earias
Earias chlorodes
Na
em
It is similar to some Phytometra, but they have thicker legs, longer palps & more triangular wings.
As the name suggests (chlorodes) they can be green, but generally seem to be pale yellow/off white.
Difficult to id with no lines or patterns whatsoever, id has to be made via physical attributes (large eyes kicking off the diagnostic filters

We found 3 specimens in March & December.
S2, dorsal
S2, profile
S3, dorsal
S3, profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tuft Moth
:Noctuoidea Nolidae
Well-beaked Tuft-moth
Nola eurrhyncha
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Eyelashes
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tuft Moth
:Noctuoidea Nolidae
Gum leaf Skeletoniser
Uraba lugens
Na
a
The main diagnostic features: Small (around 4mm), very hairy (long), 4 rows of yellow dots and they eat / live on the surfaces of gum leaves
Very variable skin colour; as can be seen. As well as orange or black heads.
Close up on one
Orange Head
Black one with others
Different sizes
Perspective
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oakworm
:Noctuoidea Notodontidae
Prominent Zig-zag Moth
Commonia hesychima
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Oakworm
:Noctuoidea Notodontidae
Bag Shelter Moth
Ochrogaster lunifer
Na
em
Other Common NameProcessionary Caterpillar

Caterpillars that form a line when travelling.
When the line is broken they form a wagon circle, until one starts heading out and the rest follow.
The larvae seem to be nocturnal, eating at night and then heading for protection after dawn to the bag; which is at the bottom of bush or tree and sometimes not the food source. One suspects the chosen home involves the best camoflage for the day; even though they are at risk while travelling.
When in procession, if the leader looses connection with the 2nd, it stops and waits for the 2nd one to catch up. Size has no bearing on who leads.
There is a large variety of sizes in one train. At least two different hatchings are visible here, so this is a community activity rather than a family one.
The bags are very well camouflaged with dried seed heads. They seem to leave a trail of silk / web on the ground to help find the bag. The silk strands were not visible in the bush.
About 10% of our Senna zygophylla in a 5 acre area were infested, but not the Senna filifolia, that are mixed in with the S. zygophylla and look so similar.
Video:
A 28 processionary caterpillar train, about 1m long. We've seen a train up to 2m (5Mb)
A small processionary caterpillar train, up close showing the "connections" (11Mb)
The silken trail of Bag shelter moth larva between their food tree and their shelter bag (16Mb)
A lot of Bag shelter moth larvae (16Mb)
Head & Back
Profile & Feet
The Canteen
Food Orgy
Off to safety
The silken road home
The front door
Home is where the BAG is
Trail covered in dew
Female Front
Female Profile
Female Wings
Female Body
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Snub Moth
:Noctuoidea Oenosandridae
Boisduval's Autumn Moth
Oenosandra boisduvalii
Na
a
 
Male, Adult, profile
Male, Adult, dorsal
Male, Adult, front
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Plume Moth
:Pterophorioidea Pterophoridae
Xerodes Plume Moth
Stangeia xerodes
Na
ma
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Plume Moth
:Pterophorioidea Pterophoridae
Horehound Plume Moth
Wheeleria spilodactylus
I
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Saltbush Web Spinner
Achyra affinitalis
Na
ema
Other Common NameCotton Web Spinner

It's interesting that the brown morphs were photographed in the Adelaide Hills. The Red Morphs were photographed in the Murray Mallee, with a propensity for red sandy loam; suggesting a camouflage variation for local areas.
Body & head length ~10mm & wingspan ~24mm
Dark Brown Morph, dorsal
Dark Brown Morph, profile
Light Brown Morph, dorsal
Light Red Morph, dorsal
Light Red Morph, dorsal
Light Red Morph, profile
Dark Red Morph, dorsal
Dark Red Morph, profile
Dark Red Morph, partial Hindwing
Dark Red Morph, very worn
Dark Red Morph, scales
Dark Red Morph, head, close up
Dark Red Morph, antenna
Light Brown Morph, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Yellow Striped Crambid
Glaucocharis dilatella
Na
a
Other Common NameOcellated Web Moth

A stunning little moth on screen, yet nondescript to the naked eye.
Generally sits with it's legs forward and antennae laid back over it's body.
Large scaly palps held out forward making quite a snout
The forewings wings trail with longitudinal short yellow stripes separated by black marks. Followed by metallic silver, black, then silver transverse stripes.
Dorsal, length ~10mm, wingspan ~15mm
Profile
Palps
Camouflage
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Grass Webworm
Hednota cyclosema
Na
em
Other Common NamePasture Webworm

Wingspan ~20mm
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Metallic Grass Webworm
Hednota eremenopa
Na
em
Other Common NamePasture Webworm

Wingspan ~20mm
Dorsal
Profile
3 Bars
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Grass Webworm
Hednota opulentellus
Na
a
Other Common NamePasture Webworm

Wingspan ~30mm
S4:In Nature
S13:Profile
S13:Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Black Grass Webworm
Hednota pedionoma
Na
em
Other Common NamePasture Webworm

Wingspan ~24mm
S1: Profile
S2: Dorsal
S2: Dorsal, spread wings
S2: Profile
S2: Anterior
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Grass Webworm
Hednota relatalis
Na
a
Other Common NamePasture Webworm

Wingspan ~27mm
S1: In Nature
S2: Profile
S2: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Cabbage Centre Grub Moth
Hellula hydralis
Na
ema
We are staggered with the variations in the colours of some moths. We indicate they are different morphs in our site here to help people id them, but it's possible they fade. Fading is different to wearing. Some moth scales wear off and you can see their "skin" were all the scales have worn. This can make id difficult where the scale with patterns don't exist. Others can loose large chunks of their trailing wings, which can hold diagnostic patterns. And then, like here, they can have massive variations in the darkness of the scales, but the lines are just visible to id the moth; barely.
Having changed all our common names of moths whose larvae feed on agricultural plants to their native plant food, we are unable to do this with this species. It caterpillars feed on Brassicaceae, with no natives in this plant family in the region. As such, we can assume we only see them due to the copious infestations of Ward's Weed, etc, throughout the Murraylands.
Profile
Dark Morph, partial Hindwing
Medium Morph, dorsal
Pale Morph, dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Metallarcha Moth
Metallarcha beatalis
Na
em
SynonymBotys beatalis

It seems there are two types of this species. It's possible it's gender, but that's not clear. Our "Type 1" doesn't have solid bars on the fore-wings. Our "Type 2" does.
Type 1, Hindwing, wingspan ~28mm
Type 1, dorsal
Type 1, Head profile
Type 1, ventral
Type 1, outside
Type 2, Hindwings
Type 2, dorsal
Type 2, profile
Type 2, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Metallarcha Moth
Metallarcha calliaspis
Na
em
 
Dorsal & Hindwings, wingspan ~24mm
Profile
Head
Anterior
Camouflage
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Golden Metallarcha Moth
Metallarcha diplochrysa
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us
 
Dorsal, ~10mm
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Metallarcha Moth
Metallarcha thiophara
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
White Dashed Crambid
Metasia capnochroa
Na
a
 
Posterior, ~6mm
Ventral, wingspan ~15mm
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Antler Moth
Nacoleia rhoeoalis
Na
a
SynonymBotys hypsidesalis
 
Dorsal, ~7mm
Profile
Profile
Anterior
Antenna
Ventral, wingspan ~16mm
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
White Streaked Crambid
Nechilo macrogona
Na
ema
The usual diagnostic feature of having different antennae does not seem to separate out the genders with this species. We have assumed the fatter body is female.
Patchy white palps
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Male, dorsal
Male, Hindwing
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Spotted Crambid
Nomophila corticalis
Na
em
 
Dark morph, dorsal
Pale morph, profile
Pale morph, dorsal, wings out slightly
Mid morph, dorsal
Antenna
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Black and White Crambid
Scoparia exhibitalis
Na
a
Thank you Don Herbison-Evans for identifying this species for us
 
S1: Dorsal
S2: Dorsal, length ~9mm, wingspan ~20mm
S3: Profile
S1: Palps
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Crambid Snout Moth
:Pyraloidea Crambidae
Wattle Moth
Uresiphita ornithopteralis
Na
ema
Other Common NameTree Lucerne Moth
 
Whole
Head
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Grass Moth
:Pyraloidea Pyralidae
Variable Bent-wing
Araeopaschia sp ?
Na
em
This has been a very difficult species to id.
As always, please only take our id's as a starting point for your own reseach.
Dorsal, ~10mm
Profile, wingspan ~25mm
Anterior
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Grass Moth
:Pyraloidea Pyralidae
Small Tabby
Etiella behrii
Na
ema
 
Female, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, anterior
Male, Palps
Male, Antenna
Male, Very Worn
Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Grass Moth
:Pyraloidea Pyralidae
Striped Snout Moth
Etiella chrysoporella
Na
ema
 
Slight Profile
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Grass Moth
:Pyraloidea Pyralidae
One-eyed Moth
Mimaglossa nauplialis
Na
ema
Looks very similar to M. habitalis, but M. habitalis has a wingspan of about 40mm, M. nauplialis has a wing span of out 25mm, which is the size of those in these photos.
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Body + Hindwings
More Hindwings
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Grass Moth
:Pyraloidea Pyralidae
Black Pyralid
Stericta carbonalis
Na
ema
 
S2: Deceased, dorsal
S4: Deceased, dorsal
S4: Deceased, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Case Moth
:Tineoidea Psychidae
Scruffy Case Moth
Ardiosteres moretonella
Na
em
These scruffy looking moths look almost spiky due to the number of scales randomly protruding from the body & wings.
About 9mm head & body length, ~22m wingspan.
S1: Dorsal
S1: Profile
S2: Partial Hindwing
S1: Anterior
S1: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Case Moth
:Tineoidea Psychidae
Faggot Case Moth
Clania ignobilis
Na
em
Species can be identified by the unevenness of the sticks on the case. All species in this family have unique cases.
Thanks to Nina Maurovic for letting use know a "faggot" means a bundle of sticks. Clearly not intended here as the offense to homosexuals.
These are parasitised by flies, as shown here: Parasitic Fly (Tritaxys sp)
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Case Moth
:Tineoidea Psychidae
Case Moth
Lepidoscia heliochares
Na
em
We were very excited with this find as it was the first adult specimen of a case we had found. Yet were very family with seeing the cases hanging from bushes as we walk Ellura.
Whole, profile, ~10mm
Dorsal & Hindwing
Anterior
Ventral
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Case Moth
:Tineoidea Psychidae
Case Moth
Psychidae sp
Na
em
We suspect this is the Leaf Case Moth (Hyalarcta huebneri), but are not confident
Larva: On the Move
Larva: Front
Larva: Casing & Size
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tineid Moth
:Tineoidea Tineidae
Bird Nest Moth
Monopis crocicapitella
Na
em
Other Common NameBlack and brown tineid

Tineids usually eat dead organic matter, like clothes, and in this case Bird's Nests
Dorsal
Head
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tineid Moth
:Tineoidea Tineidae
Tineid Case Moth
Tineidae sp
Na
em
This is a most unusual Case moth as it's case is made of sand. We thought it was a caddisfly, but they are aquatic and the head of this is not that of a caddisfly but of some type of caterpillar.
We then thought it was a Case moth (Psychidae), but they don't make their cases out of sand.
Finally we found this family makes cases out of all sorts of things, including sand.
The most well known is the introduced cloths moth (Tinea pellionella) but would be surprised those could survive the semi-arid conditions. Many species in this family make cases.
Larva: On the Move
Larva: Front
Larva: Casing
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Tortrix Moth
Anisogona similana
Na
a
 
Dorsal, ~10mm
Profile
Head
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Red Leaf Roller
Capua intractana
Na
em
 
Dorsal, ~8mm
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Sida Tipworm Moth
Crocidosema plebejana
Na
em
Other Common NameCotton Tipworm Moth

We have no cotton in SA, but this species is still found. It's caterpillars feed on Malvaceae. Limstone Sida & Clustered Lawrencia are the only Malvaceae plants we've found on Ellura so far. As is our general stance on common names, it's wrong to call something by the introduced plant it eats when it was surviving happily before European invasion.
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Leaf Roller Moth
Cryptoptila australana
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Light Brown Wattle Moth
Epiphyas postvittana
Na
a
Other Common NameLight Brown Apple Moth
 
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Brown Tortrix Moth
Epiphyas xylodes
Na
a
 
S2: Dorsal
S1: Dorsal
S1: Profile
S1: Hindwings
S2: Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Patchy Leaf Roller
Grapholita sp ES1
Na
em
You can see the colour of this one specimen varies considerably depending on the angle of the flash light. From dark brown to almose white.
Profile
Dorsal, ~7mm
Ventral
No reflection
Reflecting
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Patched Leaf Roller
Grapholita sp ES2
Na
em
 
Dorsal, ~7mm
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Metallic Leaf Roller
Grapholita sp ES3
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Pink Tufted Moth
Heliocosma anthodes
Na
em
Our 700th native species from Ellura.
Profile
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Black and White Tufted Moth
Heliocosma melanotypa
Na
em
 
Profile
Dorsal
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Striking Tortrix Moth
Meritastis pyrosemana
Na
a
 
Dorsal
Profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Tortrix Moth
:Tortricoidea Tortricidae
Diamond-backed Tortrix Moth
Oxysemaphora notialis
Na
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Sedge Moth
:Yponomeutoid Glyphipterigidae
Sedge Moth
Glyphipterix chrysoplanetis
Na
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Sedge Moth
:Yponomeutoid Glyphipterigidae
Metallic Sedge Moth
Glyphipterix meteora
Na
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Diamondback Moth
:Yponomeutoid Plutellidae
Cabbage Moth
Plutella xylostella
I
ema
Other Common NameDiamondback Moth

This introduced species is highly variable in it's colours. The antennae always have banding, however, and point forward.
S2: Pale
S3: Darker
S3: Profile
S6: Profile, ~6mm
S6: Vental, wingspan ~15mm
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Cup Moth
:Zygaenoidea Limacodidae
Cup Moth
Doratifera sp
Na
em
While we knew some people were sensitive to caterpillar hairs, we didn't realise they could be poisonous.
Well this one is! Apparently it's worse than a bee sting. We were so lucky not to get stung, because the bush was full of them, and were pushing into it to get good angles for the photo's.
You can be stung just by brushing passed them.
You can see in the close up that it's feeling threatened, and the spines are protruding. If you look closely you can see a little edge on each one about half way along; that's where it retracts. They are hypodermic needles filled with poison!
In future we'll be treating these with a lot more respect & distance
Back
Front
Profile
Isometric
Spines Armed
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Cup Moth
:Zygaenoidea Limacodidae
Golden Cup Moth
Pseudanapaea denotata
Na
em
Always surprises me to see moth playing dead.
We were testing a new LED work light out as a moth light. Worked very well. Unfortunately this fellow sat on it (stuffing up the lighting), flapped about a lot and either exhausted itself or felt threatened by the camera. After a while it just keeled over and looked dead (when I got the ventral shot). It later "recovered" and flew away
S1: Male, profile
S1: Male, dorsal
S1: Male, anterior
S2: Male, Antenna
S2: Male, clear wings
S2: Male, body
S2: Male, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Forester Moth
:Zygaenoidea Zygaenidae
Wasp Mimicking Forester
Myrtartona rufiventris
Na
em
SPECIAL: These are the 1st ever female photo's of this species on-line, as well as the 1st ventral photo's of this species on-line.
The top of the body is orange, which is very visible in flight. This, plus the long visible antennae, make them look very much like a wasp to the naked eye.
Black/brown matt wings (unlike it's cousin the Green Forester) with white flecks (and can have a white spot on each wing, but we haven't seen this).
They are white underneath, with the male having black stripes and the female having black & brown patches.
They love our M. lanceolata bushes. Apparantly the caterpillers eat them, so the adults are attracted to them at mating time (December in our area).
A quick note: These specimens are alive, just cold from being put in the fridge to calm down, and were released and flew away within the hour.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, orange abdomen
Male, orange abdomen
Male, ventral
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, orange abdomen
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Forester Moth
:Zygaenoidea Zygaenidae
Satin-green Forester
Pollanisus viridipulverulenta
Na
a
An incredibly shiny, metallic moth. Almose every surface is reflective, with a base colour of green, but depending on lighting and reflection can look any array of colours; from black, blue through green & copper.
The hindwing is a non-metallic plain brown.
There are only 2 specimens here, a male & a female highlighting the colour variations.
The female does have a non metalic, golden tuft on the tip of her abdomen.
It's very hard to differentiate the male & female from the antennae. While they are dramatically different the male tends to hold the filaments close to the core making them look very similar most of the time. Where as the gold tip on the female can be readily seen from side angles.
Male, dorsal, natural colour
Male, dorsal, ~11mm
Male, Body + partial Hindwing
Male, Head, dorsal
Male, Palps + Double filament antenna
Male, Antenna, under
Male, anterior
Male, ventral
Female, dorsal
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, head
Female, ventral
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Skippers
Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae
Southern Grass-dart
Ocybadistes walkeri
L
a
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Gossamer-winged Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Lycaenidae
Rayed Blue
Candalides heathi
R
ema
The visibility of the veins on the inside colouring is very dependant on light angles.
Outside
Inside
Inside
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Gossamer-winged Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Lycaenidae
Icilius Hairstreak
Jalmenus icilius
R
em
Other Common NamesAmethyst Hairstreak or Icilius Blue
 
Wings, ventral
Dorsal
Body, profile
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Gossamer-winged Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Lycaenidae
Two-spotted Line-blue
Nacaduba biocellata
C
em
Other Common Name2-spotted Line-blue

Looks very similar to the common grass-blue & pea-blue butterflies.
It is more brown with 2 distinctive spots on the rear wings.
S2: Topside, damaged specimen
S2: Underside
S3: Topside
S4: Underside, brown edge
S5: Underside
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Gossamer-winged Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Lycaenidae
Wattle Blue
Theclinesthes miskini ssp miskini
C
em
 
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Gossamer-winged Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Lycaenidae
Saltbush Blue
Theclinesthes serpentatus
C
ema
SynonymTheclinesthes serpentata
 
Underside
Topside
Rear
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Gossamer-winged Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Lycaenidae
Grass-blue
Zizina otis ssp labradus
C
ema
SynonymsZizina labradus, Zizina otis

There seems to be some disagreement over the binomial name with these. Our naming comes from Atlas of Living Australia, a federal government web site that publishes the names of all Australian creatures, along with sightings, etc.
Topside wings
Partial Profile
Veins
Underside
From Adelaide Hills
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Lesser Wanderer
Danaus petilia
L
em
One of the more beautiful butterflies in South Australia.
Large and graceful
Body is black with white polka dots.
The wings have gentle brown tones, ending in stark black and white edges.
Male, showing tail pincers / forceps
Male, tail pincers / forceps retracted
Male, ventral, forewings extended
Male, ventral, forewings retracted
Male, dorsal, head & body
Male, profile, body, head & feet
Female
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Wanderer
Danaus plexippus
I
a
Other Common NameMonarch

While this butterfly comes from the Americas. It's only food source is the introduced Milkweed.
There is some discussion if it arrives under it's own steam to the Eastcoast of Australia. Even so, it wouldn't be able to propogate without the weed. Regardless, it's not native to SA.
Male, dorsal
Male, underwing
Male, Sex Marks
Male, Head
Female, dorsal
Female, underwings
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Klug's Xenica
Geitoneura klugii
Na
a
Other Common NameMarbled Xenica

Similar Species: Black-rimmed Brown
While generally females are paler (particularly the dark patch under the forewing), this is not a reliable diagnostic feature. However, the males have an additional band on their upper forewings which is absent in females. This "sex band" can appear silver in the right lighting conditions.
Female, Wings, upper
Male, Wings, upper
Male, Silver 'sex band'
Male, Hindwing, under
Male, Forewing, under
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Black-rimmed Brown
Heteronympha merope
C
ema
Other Common NameCommon Brown

Similar Species: Klug's Xenica  
Male, dorsal
Male, ventral
Male, profile
Female on dirty glass
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Meadow Argus
Junonia villida
C
ema
Brown & orange butterfly with 4 trailing "eye" pattern on the wings.
Larva, profile
Larva, anterior
Larva, curled
Larva, ventral
Adult
Adult
Underwings
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Australian Admiral
Vanessa itea
L
ema
Other Common NameYellow Admiral

Brilliant blue eye on the forewings, with brown marbled rear wings.
Male, Underside Wings
Male, Topside Wings
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
Brown Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae
Australian Painted Lady
Vanessa kershawi
C
ema
Medium sized butterfly with 3 blue and 1 black spots (eye mimics) on the rear (outer margin) of the hindwings.
An attractive array of orange, black & white patterns.
They have hairy eyes!
Various specimens are missing some of the black line on the hindwing forward of the black eye spot.
We found 2 specimens that had spurious white spot in the middle of orange patches. However, they are in different places to each other, and not on any others we've found. They look like some sort of invert (eg a white mite), but the spots are in identical places on each side of the wing.
Missing black hindwing line
Has the black hindwing line
White spot, middle orange patch
White spot, inner orange patch
Old & worn
Damaged, can still fly
Under Wings
Forewings Retracted
Hairy Eyes
Anterior
Courting
Mating
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
White & Yellow Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Pieridae
Caper White
Belenois java ssp teutonia
M
ema
 
Male, white body
Male, dark body
Male, yellow on forewing
Male, yellow on forewing
Male, no yellow on forewing
Male, few black stripes
Female, Topside
Female, ventral
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
White & Yellow Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Pieridae
Spotted Jezebel
Delias aganippe
R
em
Other Common NameWood White

A brightly coloured butterfly with red, yellow and white splashes on black.
Someone loose their 1970's kitchen curtains?-)
Female
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
White & Yellow Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Pieridae
Small Grass-yellow Butterfly
Eurema smilax
M
em
About 12mm long and about 30mm wingspan.
Small, common, yellow butterfly. The brown markings are not easily visible. Very bright yellow when flying.
There are pale & bright summer forms along with browner & richer winter forms. The colour variation shows up on the underwings. The top of the head can also be pale brown to black.
Surprisingly they can still fly while and mating. Shown here are 2 photo's where they even swap positions (ie which is on top holding & which is hanging). One assumes the female is the larger of the two.
They are difficult to differentiate the genders.
'Winter' Form
'Winter' Form
'Summer' Form
Veins
In sunlight
Camouflaged
Uncamouflaged
Mating Pair, bush 1
Mating Pair, bush 2
Upperwings
Underwings
Female laying eggs
Butterflies & Moths
Lepidoptera
White & Yellow Butterfly
Papilionoidea: Pieridae
Small Cabbage White
Pieris rapae
I
ema
Other Common NameCabbage White
 
Underside Wings
Topside Wings

Copyright © 1996- Brett & Marie Smith. All Rights Reserved.
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